The Easiest Way to Find Healthcare Jobs

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Healthcare in America is about to see some serious growth! 

In fact, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that roughly 1.9 million new jobs are going to spring up by the end of 2028 in this industry. According to the Bureau, there’s an expected 14% growth in the number of healthcare jobs for the next 10 years, which is significantly higher when compared to all other employment groups (which average 5%).

This is excellent news since most of the medical field usually carries a higher median wage when compared to other occupations in the economy (compare a median salary of $66,440 for healthcare positions against $38,640—the average for the country in general). And while technical support jobs have a slightly lower median wage than the average ($29,740), they usually don’t require a high level of education and are generally easy to enter.

The following medical jobs list and the salaries presented with each entry are all based on the Bureau’s latest 2018 data. You will notice that they all vary when it comes to their educational requirements, the salaries they offer, and their predicted growth rates. We also included data on whether you need additional on-the-job training. Finally, keep in mind that the predictions on employment and job growth (the 10-year job outlook) is an educated prediction made by the Bureau—but is in no way a guarantee.

The healthcare careers below include both relevant healthcare practitioners and their related technical occupations (surgeons and registered nurses, for example), as well as healthcare support occupations (like home health aides and medical transcriptionists).

Types of Healthcare Jobs

Athletic Trainers

Athletic trainers specialize in learning how to prevent and treat muscle and bone injuries, as well as the illnesses that affect them. This is one of the rare jobs in the medical field where those in this position interact directly with athletes on a regular basis. Essentially, their job is to keep the athlete in tip-top shape and to help them get healthy if the worst happens.

They most often work full time and might have to travel with teams during sporting events. This also means they might have to work on the weekends or evenings.

  • Number of Jobs: 31,100
  • Required Level of Education: Bachelor’s degree
  • Median Pay: $47,510 ($22.84 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 19% (5,900)
  • Additional Training: None required

Audiologists

Working as an audiologist means specializing in hearing and inner ear problems. Audiologists work with patients who have problems with their balance, as well as those who are (potentially) hard of hearing.

Like many health care jobs, they can expect to work in public health, or they may join a private practice. However, depending on the contract, they might work in schools or travel between various facilities to places where their specialized skills are needed. 

  • Number of Jobs: 13,600
  • Required Level of Education: Doctoral or professional degree
  • Median Pay: $75,920 ($36.50 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 16% (2,200)
  • Additional Training: None required

Chiropractors

Chiropractic positions are among the health and wellness jobs that truly have a hands-on approach, quite literally. Chiropractors provide “neuromuscular therapy,” requiring them to adjust their patient’s back, spine, and joints.

They’re also there to provide advice, inspect and correct postural issues that might aggravate existing back pain, and generally guide the patient toward a healthier lifestyle.

Working as a chiropractor means they’re on their feet for a lengthy period of time, working from specialized chiropractic offices.

  • Number of Jobs: 50,300
  • Required Level of Education: Doctoral or professional degree
  • Median Pay: $71,410 ($34.33 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 7% (3,700)
  • Additional Training: None required

Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians

If you’re interested in lab-based jobs in public health, becoming a technologist or technician is an excellent choice. While both perform tests and procedures, collect samples, and analyze these samples, there’s some difference between these two jobs. Technicians work under lab technologists, performing former routine analyses, while the other does more complex work.

They will be working with bodily fluids and tissue samples, as well as sophisticated equipment and machinery. They’re often on their feet while conducting tests and sit in front of a computer to analyze the data acquired.

  • Number of Jobs: 331,700
  • Required Level of Education: Bachelor’s degree           
  • Median Pay: $52,330 ($25.16 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 11% (35,100)
  • Additional Training: None required

Dental Assistants

Dental assistants have a host of tasks on their hands. One of the more administrative-based medical professions, a dental assistant will do some recordkeeping work, schedule appointments, and work on billing and payment tasks. However, they must also prepare both the patients and the work area for any and all relevant procedures and treatments. This includes processing dental X-rays and assisting the dentist during actual medical procedures.

Medical field jobs like this one will require that employees have good people skills and can handle administrative tasks. They’ll also need the appropriate training and education to know how to deal with some basic dental work.

  • Number of Jobs: 346,000
  • Required Level of Education: Postsecondary nondegree award
  • Median Pay: $38,660 ($18.59 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 11% (38,700)
  • Additional Training: None required

Dental Hygienist

A dental hygienist examines a patient’s teeth, specifically looking for dental and gum disease. They also work on cleaning people’s teeth, removing tartar and plaque.

This is one of the medical field careers where employees get access to lots of gadgets and tools. They use ultrasonic tools and lasers to polish people’s teeth, remove stains, and apply treatments ordered by the dentist.

They also draft reports and examinations, and present them to the dentist for review. This means writing reports, recognizing signs of illness, and using X-ray machines. They do not, however, perform surgeries of any kind.

  • Number of Jobs: 219,800
  • Required Level of Education: Associate’s degree         
  • Median Pay: $74,820 ($35.97 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 11% (23,700)
  • Additional Training: None required

Dentists

One of the best jobs in the medical field that pay well, dental work means repairing or removing damaged teeth, prescribing medication, and advising patients on appropriate lifestyle changes to improve their oral health.

Dentists have a lot of freedom and flexibility when it comes to both employment and specialization. Public work and private practices are both excellent and viable paths, allowing them to work in accordance with their talents and preferences.

As far as specializations are concerned, they may focus on anesthesiology, working with children, specializing in the gums or jaw issues, radiology, etc.  

  • Number of Jobs: 155,000
  • Required Level of Education: Doctoral or professional degree
  • Median Pay: $156,240 ($75.12 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 7% (11,600)
  • Additional Training: Required for specialists (state-dependent)

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers and Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians, Including Vascular Technologists

These are the best medical jobs for those who enjoy working with high-tech equipment. These technicians, technologists, and sonographers are also known as diagnostic imaging workers. Working in one of these areas means they use special equipment to examine patients.

Sonographers use special devices, like ultrasound machines and ultrasound transducers to scan certain areas of the patient’s body, later displaying them as images that are used by doctors.

Cardiovascular technologists and technicians, along with vascular technologists, work with EKG machines and do cardiac catheterization.

Sonographers, technologists, and technicians all assist doctors in analyzing the relevant scans.

  • Number of Jobs: 130,700
  • Required Level of Education: Associate’s degree         
  • Median Pay: $67,080 ($32.25 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 14% (18,000)
  • Additional Training: None required

Dieticians and Nutritionists

This is one of those careers in the medical field for people who prefer to take a holistic view to gain insight into the lives and lifestyles of their patients. Dietitians and nutritionists help patients improve their health through their diet. According to their preferences, their eating habits, and their budgets, they assist patients in creating the best and healthiest meal plans for their needs.

  • Number of Jobs: 70,900
  • Required Level of Education: Bachelor’s degree           
  • Median Pay: $60,370 ($29.02 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 11% (8,000)
  • Additional Training: Residency

EMTs and Paramedics

Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics are on the front lines when it comes to medical care. These are the best healthcare jobs for people who are good under pressure and want to really be in the trenches.

They’re supposed to perform under pressure and help people on the fly, all while transporting patients to medical facilities.

They must be excellent drivers and also be in solid physical shape. Working continually under pressure—always on the move—is physically exhausting and highly taxing. EMT work isn’t for the faint of heart, especially because work schedules can also vary to a significant degree.

  • Number of Jobs: 262,100
  • Required Level of Education: Postsecondary nondegree award
  • Median Pay: $34,320 ($16.50 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 7% (18,700)
  • Additional Training: None required

Exercise Physiologists

Exercise physiologists are often compared to physical therapists. However, while these are both excellent careers in health care that deal with fitness, movement, and exercise, their goals are different. Exercise physiologists help patients recover from certain diseases and illnesses through exercise programs and movement (instead of treating physical injuries and musculoskeletal issues like physical therapists do).

Exercise physiologists analyze a patient’s medical history and create custom fitness and exercise programs to help them lose weight, This is all achieved while helping patients improve their lung capacity, heart rate, and whatever part of their body has been damaged by disease.

  • Number of Jobs: 15,800
  • Required Level of Education: Bachelor’s degree
  • Median Pay: $49,270 ($23.69 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 10% (1,500)
  • Additional Training: None required

Genetic Counselors

This is perhaps the only career in healthcare that goes into intense detail when it comes to family medical histories. Genetic counselors assess an individual’s risk and predisposition to the medical issues that run in their family. This includes inherited conditions, genetic disorders, and birth defects.

A genetic counselor will analyze data gathered by lab technologists and counsel patients and families regarding these issues. They typically have a regular work schedule, with standard work hours.

  • Number of Jobs: 3,000
  • Required Level of Education: Master’s degree  
  • Median Pay: $80,370 ($38.64 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 27% (800)
  • Additional Training: None required

Home Health Aides and Personal Care Aides

Working as a home health or personal care aide means working with individuals who need help and assistance in their daily lives. Each of these represents a medical career that assists people living with disabilities, chronic illnesses, or cognitive impairments.

Now, the main difference between these two jobs is that personal care aides, also known as caregivers, don’t provide any medical assistance (besides basic first aid). Home health aides, on the other hand, help with prescribed exercise, give medication, and provide medical assistance, if needed.

Those in one of these two medical jobs will most likely adapt their schedule to the schedules of their patients.

  • Number of Jobs: 3,253,000
  • Required Level of Education: High school diploma or equivalent           
  • Median Pay: $24,060 ($11.57 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 36% (1,185,800)
  • Additional Training: Short-term

Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses     

LPNs and LVNs provide basic medical care and are under the direct supervision of fully registered nurses and physicians. They can expect to do tasks like changing bandages, inserting catheters, changing sheets, checking blood pressure, and keeping patients comfortable.

These are among the best medical careers for those who enjoy taking care of people directly. However, like any other nurse, they have to spend hours upon hours on their feet while working difficult and strenuous shifts.

  • Number of Jobs: 728,900
  • Required Level of Education: Postsecondary nondegree award
  • Median Pay: $46,240 ($22.23 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 11% (78,100)
  • Additional Training: None required

Massage Therapists

This is one of the healthcare medical jobs that are all about a hands-on approach. Using touch, they manipulate patients’ muscles and soft tissue—relieving pain, improving circulation, and helping them heal their injuries.

Massage therapists can specialize in multiple different directions. Swedish massages, working with athletes, or working with the elderly are all options. While it’s one of the more physical health jobs, forcing therapists to stand in the same spot for hours at a time, they also work in a rather relaxed environment, with an even more relaxing schedule.

  • Number of Jobs: 159,800
  • Required Level of Education: Postsecondary nondegree award
  • Median Pay: $41,420 ($19.92 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 22% (35,400)
  • Additional Training: None required

Medical Assistants

Working as a medical assistant is difficult to describe. It represents a host of jobs all tied into one, depending on location, the size of the medical practice, and the specialty of said practice.

Medical Assistants record a patient’s history and take note of their personal information. They might also prep blood samples, give patients medication and injections, assist with patient examinations, and so on.

They may focus on health administration jobs or specialize as a clinical medical assistant, basically choosing between administrative and clinical work.

  • Number of Jobs: 686,600
  • Required Level of Education: Postsecondary nondegree award
  • Median Pay: $33,610 ($16.16 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 23% (154,900)
  • Additional Training: None required

Medical Transcriptionists

Also known as healthcare documentation specialists, this job is to listen to physicians’ audio recordings, and convert them into actual reports. They review and edit drafts, use speech recognition software, and keep it all consistent and clear.

While it seems like one of the simpler medical office jobs, they must be familiar with medical jargon, understanding the material well enough to notice inconsistencies and errors and know how to avoid them when drafting a report.

  • Number of Jobs: 58,000
  • Required Level of Education: Postsecondary nondegree award
  • Median Pay: $34,770 ($16.72 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: -3% (-200) *Decline
  • Additional Training: None

Medical Records and Health Information Technicians

One of the more administration-based healthcare industry jobs, these technicians organize and manage health information data, preparing it in both electronic and paper form, keeping it accurate, accessible, and safe.

Their duties consist of reviewing records, looking for completeness and accuracy. They must be very familiar with electronic health records (EHRs), knowing how to use EHR software fully.

  • Number of Jobs: 215,500
  • Required Level of Education: Postsecondary nondegree award
  • Median Pay: $40,350 ($19.40 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 11% (23,100)
  • Additional Training: None required

Nuclear Medicine Technologists

One of the better-paid medical technologies careers, work as a nuclear medicine technologist is focused on preparing radioactive drugs, which are then most often used for therapeutic purposes. Technologists also provide technical support to physicians, and they work with monitoring imaging equipment.

They can also serve as emergency responders in case of nuclear disasters.

  • Number of Jobs: 19,300
  • Required Level of Education: Associate’s degree         
  • Median Pay: $76,820 ($36.93 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 7% (1,300)
  • Additional Training: None required

Nurse Anesthetists, Nurse Midwives, and Nurse Practitioners

These nursing careers are some of the top paying medical jobs around. Nurse anesthetists, midwives, and practitioners are known as advanced-practice registered nurses. APRNs provide patients with both primary and specialized care. However, note that their activities, i.e., the scope of their duties, vary from state to state.

Essentially, higher educational requirements (and higher salaries) for various “types” of nurses are always followed by more serious and advanced duties—and a generally more specialized workload.

  • Number of Jobs: 240,700
  • Required Level of Education: Master’s degree  
  • Median Pay: $113,930 ($54.78 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 26% (62,000)
  • Additional Training: None

Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants

Nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants work in hospitals and in long-term care facilities. Places like nursing homes or mental hospitals are popular places of employment. This type of healthcare employment requires taking direct care of patients, most likely bathing and cleaning them, helping them with some basic life tasks and activities, transferring them from beds to wheelchairs and vice versa, and transporting them around the facility.

Aides and attendants might also dispense medication and assist with some basic healthcare provision activities.

  • Number of Jobs: 1,564,200
  • Required Level of Education: High school diploma + state-mandated exam
  • Median Pay: $28,530 ($13.72 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 9% (137,800)
  • Additional Training: Short-term

Occupational Therapists

This is one of the best healthcare careers for people who wish to help others get back on their feet. An occupational therapist will help an injured or disabled individual get some skills back—skills that are necessary for daily living and work.

Working as an occupational therapist means identifying patients’ goals and helping them achieve them as best they can. This is accomplished for clients by preparing activities, planning exercises, recommending certain equipment, etc.

  • Number of Jobs: 133,000
  • Required Level of Education: Master’s degree  
  • Median Pay: $84,270 ($40.51 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 18% (23,700)
  • Additional Training: None required

Occupational Therapy Assistants and Aides

Similar to an occupational therapist, this is one of the top medical jobs for working with a single individual on a more regular, direct basis. Occupational therapy assistants help the therapist in their work, showing patients the best exercises to do and teaching them how to use the right equipment.

  • Number of Jobs: 51,700
  • Required Level of Education: Associate’s degree from an accredited program
  • Median Pay: $57,620 ($27.70 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 31% (16,000)
  • Additional Training: Short-term

Opticians

Opticians focus specifically on eyesight. They help fit eyeglasses and contact lenses for patients, all under the instructions of ophthalmologists and optometrists. Due to how it’s set up, it’s one of the rare 9–5 healthcare jobs that rarely require weekend work, or any other odd shifts.

This job is about adjusting eyewear in both aesthetic terms (how it fits on the face) and in practical terms (getting the right tints and antireflection coatings).

  • Number of Jobs: 74,500
  • Required Level of Education: High school diploma or equivalent           
  • Median Pay: $37,010 ($17.80 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 7% (5,400)
  • Additional Training: Long-term, on-the-job

Optometrists

Working as an optometrist means examining eyes and managing eye diseases, injuries, and whatever disorder or issue patients might have with their eyesight. They perform vision tests, prescribe eyeglasses and contact lenses, and suggest any necessary rehabilitation or treatment.

This is a top medical job when it comes to pay, but it requires extensive education.

  • Number of Jobs: 42,100
  • Required Level of Education: Doctoral or professional degree
  • Median Pay: $111,790 ($53.75 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 10% (4,000)
  • Additional Training: None required

Orthotists and Prosthetists

These represent a couple of the more technical medical careers in demand—and they have the largest growth rate percentage-wise. Namely, orthotists and prosthetists design and create medical prosthetics. This means artificial limbs, braces, and other medical devices.

However, they also talk to patients, evaluate their needs, and help them use their devices properly. This also includes later repair work, as needed.

  • Number of Jobs: 9,100
  • Required Level of Education: Master’s degree  
  • Median Pay: $69,120 ($33.23 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 20% (1,800)
  • Additional Training: Internship/residency

Pharmacists

While one of the more popular medical careers, this one isn’t growing all that much, although it’s still a very viable choice. Working as a pharmacist means prescribing medication, providing expertise when it comes to using medication safely, and overseeing pharmacy technicians.

They might be a community pharmacist (working in a retail store or chain), clinical pharmacist (hospital or clinic work), or consultant pharmacist (working with insurance providers and healthcare facilities). Another option is becoming part of the pharmaceutical industry working as an adviser in marketing, sales, and R&D.

  • Number of Jobs: 314,300
  • Required Level of Education: Doctoral or professional degree
  • Median Pay: $126,120 ($60.64 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 0% (-100) *Decline
  • Additional Training: None required

Pharmacy Technicians

Like many jobs in healthcare, there’s a high chance these technicians will have to work on weekends or at odd hours. Overall, they assist pharmacists with regular pharmacy work. This means taking phone calls from customers, doing inventory, and packaging and labeling prescriptions. They might also do certain administrative tasks required by pharmacists.

  • Number of Jobs: 420,400
  • Required Level of Education: High school diploma or equivalent           
  • Median Pay: $32,700 ($15.72 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 7% (31,500)
  • Additional Training: Moderate

Phlebotomists

Phlebotomists have specialized public health jobs that center on collecting, testing, and researching blood. Their role is focused on drawing blood from donors and patients, labeling the samples, and taking it over for further processing.  

They also clean the blood draw area and maintain the medical instruments (needles, test tubes, blood vials, etc.).

  • Number of Jobs: 128,300
  • Required Level of Education: Postsecondary nondegree award
  • Median Pay: $34,480 ($16.58 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 23% (29,500)
  • Additional Training: None required

Physical Therapists

Physical therapy is one of the most popular careers in healthcare, with some of the highest predicted growth (at 22%). This type of work provides care for people who have problems caused by back issues, neck issues, sprains, breaks, amputations, arthritis, stroke, cerebral palsy—basically, any illness or injury that limits how the patient moves and uses his or her own limbs.

They design exercise programs and show patients how to execute them, all while minimizing the pain they feel through hands-on therapy and stretching.

  • Number of Jobs: 247,700
  • Required Level of Education: Doctoral or professional degree
  • Median Pay: $87,930 ($42.27 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 22% (54,200)
  • Additional Training: None required

Physician Assistants

They do healthcare management jobs focused on administration and research. However, they also actually examine patients and provide care. They serve as direct assistants to physicians and surgeons, and their specific duties depend on the state licensing them.

  • Number of Jobs: 118,800
  • Required Level of Education: Master’s degree  
  • Median Pay: $108,610 ($52.22 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 31% (37,000)
  • Additional Training: None required

Physicians and Surgeons

This is basically what people think of when they say “doctor.” These two terms include many health care careers, depending highly on the specialization of the physician or surgeon. These are some of the most difficult careers here, requiring the greatest amount of training. These include anesthesiology, family care, general practice, gynecology, psychiatry, cardiology, and neurosurgery.

  • Number of Jobs: 756,800
  • Required Level of Education: Doctoral or professional degree
  • Median Pay: $208,000 ($100.00 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 7% (55,400)
  • Additional Training: Internship/residency

Podiatrists

Being among the highest paying jobs in the medical field, podiatry is also steadily growing, albeit at a slower rate than most other positions in healthcare. The actual job is concerned with providing medical care for individuals who have issues with their feet, ankles, and lower legs in general. Podiatrists diagnose problems, treat injuries, and perform surgeries, if needed.

If you choose this healthcare career, you might perform ankle surgery and remove bone spurs. You may also prescribe special orthotics (shoe inserts) or show the patient some exercises that can help them recover. 

  • Number of Jobs: 10,500
  • Required Level of Education: Doctoral or professional degree
  • Median Pay: $129,550 ($62.28 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 6% (600)
  • Additional Training: Internship/residency

Psychiatric Technicians and Aides

Psychiatric technicians care for people who have developmental disabilities and mental illnesses. They monitor a patient’s condition, provide medication and care as instructed by a psychiatrist or psychologist, and monitor a patient’s vital signs.

Like other aid-centered careers in the medical field, psychiatric aides are there to ensure that the environment psychiatrists and technicians work in are safe and clean. They also perform menial or physical tasks like serving meals, helping patients eat, restraining dangerous patients, and transporting them around the facility when needed.

  • Number of Jobs: 138,200
  • Required Level of Education: Technicians need a postsecondary certificate, aides typically need a high school diploma           
  • Median Pay: $30,860 ($14.84 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 12% (16,300)
  • Additional Training: Short-term

Radiation Therapists

Working in one of the highest paying medical jobs, radiation therapists treat diseases (primarily cancer) through the administration of radiation treatment. This position is focused on working with machines that deliver concentrated radiation therapy toward the location of a patient’s tumor. They work with an entire oncology team composed of nurses, medical physicists, and specialized oncologists.

  • Number of Jobs: 18,600
  • Required Level of Education: Associate’s degree         
  • Median Pay: $82,330 ($39.58 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 9% (1,600)
  • Additional Training: None required

Radiologic and MRI Technologists

These are the top healthcare jobs for people who want to work in healthcare but also enjoy using high-tech equipment. However, they tend to have less contact with patients.

Rad techs use X-rays and CT scans, while MRI techs use magnetic resonance scanners in order to create the appropriate diagnostic images. In addition, they prep patients for relevant procedures, both by answering their questions and by positioning them so that the equipment can do its job properly.

  • Number of Jobs: 250,000
  • Required Level of Education: Associate’s degree         
  • Median Pay: $61,240 ($29.44 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 9% (23,300)
  • Additional Training: None required

Recreational Therapists

Recreational therapists are there to help people with injuries, disabilities, or illnesses improve their physical, social, and emotional well-being. However, they accomplish this via recreational activities.

Perhaps the best job in the medical field for creative people, a recreational therapist helps patients by incorporating modalities such as arts and crafts, drama, music, sports, games, and community outings into patients’ therapy.

They assess patients’ needs, figure out what they need, assist them in developing social skills, show them how to perform certain activities properly. Overall, they find a way to help patients make the most out of their lives.

  • Number of Jobs: 19,800
  • Required Level of Education: Bachelor’s degree           
  • Median Pay: $47,860 ($23.01 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 7% (1,400)
  • Additional Training: None required

Registered Nurses

RNs are there to provide proper care and treatment to patients. A registered nurse’s duties are rather broad and depend on the patients and the physicians they work with. Just like a few other jobs mentioned on this list of medical careers, their specialization will play a big role in this.

They consult with doctors, monitor medical equipment, communicate with patients and families, and provide instruction on taking medication and following the best home aftercare treatment.

  • Number of Jobs: 3,059,800
  • Required Level of Education: Bachelor’s degree           
  • Median Pay: $71,730 ($34.48 per hour) 
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 12% (371,500)
  • Additional Training: None required

Respiratory Therapists

Respiratory therapy is a top medical career that helps patients who have trouble breathing. They treat cardiopulmonary disorders and consult with physicians to develop treatment plans, perform diagnostic tests, and provide treatment to patients in the form of both medication and chest physiotherapy.

This job includes using equipment, helping diagnose patients, communicating treatments, and consulting with specialized physicians.

  • Number of Jobs: 134,000
  • Required Level of Education: Associate’s degree         
  • Median Pay: $60,280 ($28.98 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 21% (27,900)
  • Additional Training: None required

Speech-Language Pathologists

Also known as speech therapists, they assist children and adults who have speech disorders (as well as issues swallowing). This entry on our medical field careers list deals with patients who have speech or swallowing issues caused by a variety of conditions, such as brain injuries, hearing loss, stroke, autism, Parkinson’s disease, and developmental delays.

A speech therapist’s task is to identify treatment options; determine the extent of the speech, language, or swallowing impairment; and teach patients how to develop and strengthen their voices. They also teach patients how to strengthen the muscles used for swallowing.

  • Number of Jobs: 153,700
  • Required Level of Education: Master’s degree  
  • Median Pay: $77,510 ($37.26 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 27% (41,900)
  • Additional Training: None required

Veterinarians

One of the best careers for introverts in healthcare is working as a veterinarian. Instead of people, the patients are animals. This occupation requires treating and dressing wounds, examining animals, diagnosing problems, and performing surgeries.

Vets can specialize in a couple of different ways. They can focus on pets, small animals, livestock, and so on.

  • Number of Jobs: 84,500
  • Required Level of Education: Doctoral or professional degree
  • Median Pay: $93,830 ($45.11 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 18% (15,600)
  • Additional Training: None required

Surgical Technologists

Also known as operating room technicians, those in this role are among the core healthcare professions necessary for the effective performance of surgeries. Surgical technologists sterilize equipment, prepare the operating room, and assist surgeons, specifically by passing them the required tools and supplies.

They also prepare patients, wash and disinfect incision sites, and apply bandages and dressing to incision sites.

  • Number of Jobs: 112,100
  • Required Level of Education: Postsecondary nondegree award
  • Median Pay: $47,300 ($22.74 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 9% (9,700)

Additional Training: None required

Veterinary Assistants and Laboratory Animal Caretaker

These are perfect health services jobs if you like working and interacting with animals. These positions are all about handling animals and helping scientists, researchers, technologists, and technicians with their work. People in these roles take care of the animals, feed them, bathe them, get them some exercise, and assist in sample collection. They also provide first aid care to the animals and keep their cages, examination and operating rooms, and kennels clean and disinfected.

  • Number of Jobs: 17,600
  • Required Level of Education: High school diploma or equivalent           
  • Median Pay: $27,540 ($13.24 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 19% (17,600)
  • Additional Training: None required

Veterinary Technologists and Technicians

These are probably two of the happiest healthcare jobs for people who enjoy working with animals. Similar to vet assistants, technologists assist veterinarians in their activities and their tasks. The core difference here is that their services are a bit more complex.

They administer anesthesia, prepare animals for surgery, take X-rays, and run tests.

  • Number of Jobs: 109,400
  • Required Level of Education: Associate’s degree         
  • Median Pay: $34,420 ($16.55 per hour)
  • 10-Year Job Outlook: 19% (21,100)
  • Additional Training: None required

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the best healthcare jobs?

This entirely depends on you, your preferences, and what you consider “the best.” In terms of pay, working as a surgeon, dentist, or podiatrist means you’ll have the best healthcare job. On the other hand, maybe you’re interested in chemistry and would enjoy working as a pharmacist. Or perhaps you like tinkering with devices every day, making some type of technologist job a great choice for you.
 

How much does a healthcare job pay?

This depends greatly on the job itself. If you’re working as a healthcare practitioner or in a technical occupation, you can expect a median income of around $66,440 per year. These positions include dental hygienists, registered nurses, physicians, surgeons, and veterinarians. However, support roles (like assistants, aides, and transcriptionists) make around $29,740 per year.
 

What is the highest paying healthcare job?

The following list points out the highest paying jobs in this industry. However, we need to mention that you can expect a much higher salary if you specialize in specific areas. Physicians and surgeons – Greater than $208,000 Dentist – $156,240 Podiatrists – $129,550 Pharmacists – $126,120 APR Nurses – $113,930.
 

What is the easiest job in the medical field?

While no job in the medical field is easy, there are some differences that are undeniable. Certain aide and technologist jobs might be easier in terms of the required education level, but they might not be easy to physically perform. Conversely, healthcare administration jobs are easier in physical terms when compared to aides or nursing jobs, since you won’t be spending so much time on your feet.
 

Can I work in a hospital without a degree?

Yes, you can. Jobs like medical secretary work, as well as any job working as a specialist’s aide, is perfectly viable.
 

What is the least stressful job in the medical field?

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that entry level healthcare jobs are the least stressful. While every career comes with a certain amount of stress, administrative and office positions in healthcare (like transcriptionist jobs) might be what you’re looking for if you don’t want to experience too much pressure.
 

What is the average salary for healthcare administration?

The salary can vary to a wide degree, depending on what type of healthcare administration job you’re actually doing, as well as the system and institution you’re working at. While you can expect a median salary of $99,730, hospital executives have an average yearly salary of $339,000, with CEOs earning over a million dollars. Healthcare administration positions are probably the healthcare jobs with the greatest variance in salary.
 

What jobs can you get with a healthcare management degree?

There are many healthcare management careers you can follow with this kind of degree. A job as a healthcare administrator, health insurance manager, and population health manager, as well as quality and improvement manager are all options for someone with a bachelor’s degree in healthcare management. However, with an MBA, you can get a job in even more healthcare administration careers. These include positions such as program director, healthcare consultant, chief operations officer, chief executive officer, chief compliance officer, and many other high-level administrative jobs.
 

What healthcare jobs are in high demand?

According to the BLS, with the exception of two positions in healthcare, every single one is in demand. The industry itself—whether we’re talking about administration jobs in the office, or direct medical work careers—is predicted to see significant growth.